Category Archives: Community Outreach

CCPD & D.E.A. Prescription Take-Back-Day a Success

 

The Corpus Christi Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration hosted the 2nd Annual Prescription Drug Take-Back-Day on Saturday October, 29 2011. throughout South Texas.

The D.E.A. released the numbers of the various medications that were collected at the ten locations with a total of 892.6 pounds. The D.E.A had five locations in Corpus Christi where they collected 711.1 pounds of pills.

The CCPD and D.E.A. would like to thank all the folks who brought in their potentially dangerous prescription drugs. A huge thanks also goes out to those who donated their locations as a drop off point.

 

 

 

 

 

ORIGINAL MEDIA RELEASE

DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION CONDUCTS SECOND COASTAL BEND PRESCRIPTION DRUG TAKE-BACK DAY ON OCTOBER 29, 2011    “Living Drug Free Starts at Home”

(Corpus Christi, TX) –   The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), along with the Corpus Christi, Portland, Cuero, and Sinton Police Departments and the Kleberg County Sheriff’s Office, will provide the public another opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs.  On Saturday, October 29th, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., DEA along with its local law enforcement counterparts will host the Prescription Drug Take-Back Day.  There will be ten Take-Back locations within the Coastal Bend Community.  Additionally, students from the Texas A&M Health Science Center – Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy will be at select locations offering complimentary blood pressure and glucose screenings. 

This initiative, “Living Drug Free Starts at Home,” addresses vital public safety and health issues.  Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse.  Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high–more Americans currently abuse prescription drugs than the number of those using cocaine, hallucinogens, and heroin combined, according to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH).  The same study shows that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet.  In April of 2011, Americans turned in 376,593 pounds—188 tons—of prescription drugs at nearly 5,400 sites operated by the DEA and more than 3,000 state and local law enforcement partners.

The Prescription Take-Back service is free and no questions will be asked.

Collection Sites will be set up at the following locations:

  • KIII TV                                                      5002 S.P.I.D., Corpus Christi
  • Boys and Girls Club                              3902 Greendwood Drive, Corpus Christi
  • HEB                                                             5313 Saratoga Boulvevard, Corpus Christi
  • HEB (Flour Bluff)                                   1145 Waldron Road, Corpus Christi
  • HEB (Annaville)                                     11100 Leopard Sttreet, Corpus Christi
  • HEB                                                             1600 Wildcat Boulevard, Portland
  • Coastal Bend College                           1814 Brahma Boulevard, Kingsville
  • Kleberg County Sheriff’s Office        1500 E. King Street, Kingsville
  • Cuero City Hall                                       201 E. Main Street, Cuero
  • Sinton Chamber of Commerce         218 West Sinton Street, Sinton

Prescription drug disposal and the DEA’s Take-Back events are significant pieces of the White House’s Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Plan released this year by the Office of National Drug Control Policy.  Purging home medicine cabinets of neglected drugs is one of four strategies for reducing prescription drug abuse and diversion laid out in Epidemic:  Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis.  The other strategies include education of health care providers, patients, parents and youth; establishing prescription drug monitoring programs in all states; and increased enforcement to address doctor shopping and pill mills.

For more information and collection sites nation-wide, please visit www.dea.gov.

How to Check on Registered Sex Offenders & Halloween Safety Tips

Sex Offenders

The Corpus Christi Police Department’s Sex Offender registration coordinator will be accompanying the Nueces County Adult Probation Department on Halloween as they do spot checks on the registered sex offenders within our city. The Corpus Christi Police Department (CCPD) has a website where you can view the registered sex offenders in Corpus Christi on an interactive Google map. Sex offender locations are one of the most requested information calls into the Police Department during Halloween. The CCPD has made it extremely easy for citizens to do research on their own by using CRIMEREPORTS.com

www.crimereports.com is a web-based crime mapping system. Once on the site, enter your address along with Corpus Christi, Texas and hit enter. You will be shown the sex offenders near your home as indicated by a red and white yield sign type of symbol.  The map will show the locations, photo, address and other information of each sex offender.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has these Halloween Safety Tips that the CCPD would like to pass on to our citizens:

ALL DRESSED UP:

  • Plan costumes that are bright and reflective. Make sure that shoes fit well and that costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or contact with flame.
  • Consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and Trick-or-Treat bags for greater visibility.
  • Because masks can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic makeup and decorative hats as safer alternatives. Hats should fit properly to prevent them from sliding over eyes.
  • When shopping for costumes, wigs and accessories look for and purchase those with a label clearly indicating they are flame resistant.
  • If a sword, cane, or stick is a part of your child’s costume, make sure it is not sharp or too long. A child may be easily hurt by these accessories if he stumbles or trips.
  • Obtain flashlights with fresh batteries for all children and their escorts.
  • Do not use decorative contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from an eye care professional. While the packaging on decorative lenses will often make claims such as “one size fits all,” or “no need to see an eye specialist,” obtaining decorative contact lenses without a prescription is both dangerous and illegal. This can cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to permanent vision loss.
  • Teach children how to call 9-1-1 (or their local emergency number) if they have an emergency or become lost.

CARVING A NICHE:

  • Small children should never carve pumpkins. Children can draw a face with markers. Then parents can do the cutting.
  • Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. If you do use a candle, a votive candle is safest.
  • Candlelit pumpkins should be placed on a sturdy table, away from curtains and other flammable objects, and should never be left unattended.

HOME SAFE HOME:

  • To keep homes safe for visiting trick-or-treaters, parents should remove from the porch and front yard anything a child could trip over such as garden hoses, toys, bikes and lawn decorations.
  • Parents should check outdoor lights and replace burned-out bulbs.
  • Wet leaves should be swept from sidewalks and steps.
  • Restrain pets so they do not inadvertently jump on or bite a trick-or-treater.

ON THE TRICK-OR-TREAT TRAIL:

  • A parent or responsible adult should always accompany young children on their neighborhood rounds.
  • If your older children are going alone, plan and review the route that is acceptable to you. Agree on a specific time when they should return home.
  • Only go to homes with a porch light on and never enter a home or car for a treat.
  • Because pedestrian injuries are the most common injuries to children on Halloween, remind Trick-or Treaters:
  • Stay in a group and communicate where they will be going.
  • Carry a cell phone for quick communication.
  • Remain on well-lit streets and always use the sidewalk.
  • If no sidewalk is available, walk at the far edge of the roadway facing traffic.
  • Never cut across yards or use alleys.
  • Only cross the street as a group in established crosswalks (as recognized by local custom). Never cross between parked cars or out driveways.
  • Don’t assume the right of way. Motorists may have trouble seeing Trick-or-Treaters. Just because one car stops, doesn’t mean others will!
  • Law enforcement authorities should be notified immediately of any suspicious or unlawful activity.

HEALTHY HALLOWEEN:

  • A good meal prior to parties and trick-or-treating will discourage youngsters from filling up on Halloween treats.
  • Consider purchasing non-food treats for those who visit your home, such as coloring books or pens and pencils.
  • Wait until children are home to sort and check treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should closely examine all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
  • Try to ration treats for the days following Halloween.
The Halloween Safety Tips are also available in Spanish by clicking here. Halloween-Spanish PDF

Decision House Free Fall Festival To Hold Opening Ceremony This Evening

The Decision House free Fall Festival will take place Friday, October 28, 2011 and Saturday, October 29, 2011, from 6:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m., on the grounds of the Police Department. The Festival will encompass two different areas:

  • An alternative to a haunted house. Scenes will be acted out by local  church groups and CCISD students,  focusing on the impact poor decisions can have on themselves, their families, and the community.  Examples of the consequences of teen alcohol and drug use, involvement in gangs, and being untruthful.
  • The second area will offer live music, games, and information from local colleges, law enforcement agencies, the armed services, and other organizations. The information provided by these organizations will reinforce the concept of making the “right decision”.

Mayor Joe Adame, Chief of Police Troy Riggs, members of Faith Based Services Coalition and Citizens in Support of the CCPD Police Foundation, the Corpus Christi Citizens Police Academy Alumni, Volunteers in Police Service, along with community volunteers, will take part in an opening ceremony on Friday, October 28, 2011, at 5:00 p.m. at the Police Department, 321 John Sartain. Members of Police Explorer’s Post#133 will present the colors during the event.

CCPD and DEA to hold 2nd Annual Prescription Take-Back Day

The Corpus Christi Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration continue working together to Keep Corpus Christi Safe by hosting their 2nd Annual Prescription Take-Back for 2011. 

Please see the following news release from the Drug Enforcement Administration for additional information.

DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION CONDUCTS SECOND COASTAL BEND PRESCRIPTION DRUG TAKE-BACK DAY ON OCTOBER 29, 2011    “Living Drug Free Starts at Home”

(Corpus Christi, TX) –   The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), along with the Corpus Christi, Portland, Cuero, and Sinton Police Departments and the Kleberg County Sheriff’s Office, will provide the public another opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs.  On Saturday, October 29th, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., DEA along with its local law enforcement counterparts will host the Prescription Drug Take-Back Day.  There will be ten Take-Back locations within the Coastal Bend Community.  Additionally, students from the Texas A&M Health Science Center – Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy will be at select locations offering complimentary blood pressure and glucose screenings. 

This initiative, “Living Drug Free Starts at Home,” addresses vital public safety and health issues.  Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse.  Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high–more Americans currently abuse prescription drugs than the number of those using cocaine, hallucinogens, and heroin combined, according to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH).  The same study shows that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet.  In April of 2011, Americans turned in 376,593 pounds—188 tons—of prescription drugs at nearly 5,400 sites operated by the DEA and more than 3,000 state and local law enforcement partners.  

The Prescription Take-Back service is free and no questions will be asked. 

 Collection Sites will be set up at the following locations: 

  • KIII TV                                               5002 S.P.I.D., Corpus Christi
  • Boys and Girls Club                           3902 Greendwood Drive, Corpus Christi
  • HEB                                                      5313 Saratoga Boulvevard, Corpus Christi
  • HEB (Flour Bluff)                               1145 Waldron Road, Corpus Christi
  • HEB (Annaville)                               11100 Leopard Sttreet, Corpus Christi
  • HEB                                                     1600 Wildcat Boulevard, Portland
  • Coastal Bend College                         1814 Brahma Boulevard, Kingsville
  • Kleberg County Sheriff’s Office      1500 E. King Street, Kingsville
  • Cuero City Hall                                    201 E. Main Street, Cuero
  • Sinton Chamber of Commerce          218 West Sinton Street, Sinton

Prescription drug disposal and the DEA’s Take-Back events are significant pieces of the White House’s Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Plan released this year by the Office of National Drug Control Policy.  Purging home medicine cabinets of neglected drugs is one of four strategies for reducing prescription drug abuse and diversion laid out in Epidemic:  Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis.  The other strategies include education of health care providers, patients, parents and youth; establishing prescription drug monitoring programs in all states; and increased enforcement to address doctor shopping and pill mills. 

For more information and collection sites nation-wide, please visit www.dea.gov.

1st Annual Festival Focuses on Making Good Decisions

No one sets out to make decisions that will forever damage the course of their life. Yet every day, good individuals make wrong decisions which they may never recover from. Decision House is a realistic example of how seemingly small decisions can lead youth down a path to ruin and provides them with the tools to make the right decisions.

The Decision House free Fall Festival will take place Friday, October 28, 2011 and Saturday, October 29, 2011, from 6:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m., on the grounds of the Police Department. The Festival will encompass two different areas:

  • An alternative to a haunted house. Scenes will be acted out by local church groups and CCISD students, focusing on the impact poor decisions can have on themselves, their families, and the community. Examples the consequences of teen alcohol and drug use, involvement in gangs, and being untruthful.
  • The second area will offer live music, games, and information from local colleges, law enforcement agencies, the armed services, and other organizations. The information provided by these organizations will reinforce the concept of making the “right decision”.

Mayor Joe Adame, Chief of Police Troy Riggs, members of Faith Based Services Coalition and Citizens in Support of the CCPD Police Foundation, along with the Corpus Christi Citizens Police Academy Alumni, Volunteers in Police Service, and  community volunteers, will take part in an opening ceremony on Friday, October 28, 2011, at 6:00 p.m. at the Police Department, 321 John Sartain. Members of Police Explorer’s Post#133 will present the colors during the event.

The first annual Decision House Fall Festival will officially open at 6:00 p.m. Everyone who tours Decision House will receive a free hot dog, bag of chips, and a soda until supplies run out. Free parking is available at a lot located at the corner of N. Chaparral and Cooper’s Alley.

To register for a group tour contact DeAnna McQueen, Special Projects Coordinator, at (361) 826-2940.

Week Without Violence Family Festival Announced

The Corpus Christi Police Department would like to invite the public to a free YWCA’s Week Without Violence Family Festival at Smith Elementary, 6902 Williams, Corpus Christi, Tx on Monday, October 24, 2011.

CASA of the Coastal Bend will host a “Lighting the Way to Protect Our Children” ceremony at 7:30 p.m.

Please see attached flyer for additional information.  WWOV Family Festival Printable Flyer

Police Athletic League Receives $96,000 Donation

The Corpus Christi Police Athletic League (CC-PAL) received two checks from Valero Refinery today. The initial check was in the amount of $14,600 and was raised in part at the Valero Texas Open 2011. The CC-PAL was one of many who received funding.

The second check, in the amount of $81,500, was raised through the efforts of the more than 23 sponsors at the First Annual CC Police Athletic League & Valero – Bill Greehey Refinery Dove Hunt/Skeet Shoot Fundraiser held on October 1, 2011 at the Berry “Lonesome Ranch”.

Chief of Police Troy Riggs said that today’s generous donation is an outstanding example of what can be accomplished when the community and their police department are engaged towards building a future for their children.

CC-PAL is a non-profit, 501(c) 3 registered organization that is sponsored by the Corpus Christi Police Department for at-risk children. CC-PAL operates solely on the generous donations and financial contributions of the local community.

CC-PAL was formed in 2002 with a mission to offer athletic and educational programs to at-risk children in an ongoing effort to reduce juvenile crime, and to do so in a safe environment. The organization has been so successful that it now offers numerous programs for over 2000 at-risk children. CC-PAL introduces these children, many for the first time, to martial arts, baseball, softball, cheerleading, basketball, volleyball and tutoring all at either no charge or at a minimal fee. CC-PAL is open to any child between the ages of 3 to 18.

1st Annual Festival Focuses on Making Good Decisions

 No one sets out to make decisions that will forever damage the course of their life. Yet every day, good individuals make wrong decisions which they may never recover from. Decision House is a realistic example of how seemingly small decisions can lead youth down a path to ruin and provides them with the tools to make the right decisions.

The Decision House free Fall Festival will take place Friday, October 28, 2011 and Saturday, October 29, 2011, from 6:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m., on the grounds of the Police Department. The Festival will encompass two different areas:

  • An alternative to a haunted house. Scenes will be acted out by local church groups and CCISD students, focusing on the impact poor decisions can have on themselves, their families, and the community. Examples the consequences of teen alcohol and drug use, involvement in gangs, and being untruthful.
  • The second area will offer live music, games, and information from local colleges, law enforcement agencies, the armed services, and other organizations. The information provided by these organizations will reinforce the concept of making the “right decision”.

Mayor Joe Adame, Chief of Police Troy Riggs, members of Faith Based Services Coalition and Citizens in Support of the CCPD Police Foundation, along with volunteers, will take part in an opening ceremony on Friday, October 28, 2011, at 5:00 p.m. at the Police Department, 321 John Sartain. Members of Police Explorer’s Post#133 will present the colors during the event.

The first annual Decision House Fall Festival will officially open at 6:00 p.m. Everyone who tours Decision House will receive a free hot dog, bag of chips, and a soda. Free parking is available at a lot located at the corner of N. Chaparral and Cooper’s Alley. To register for a group tour contact DeAnna McQueen, Special Projects Coordinator, at (361) 826-2940.

Red Ribbon Week Activities Announced

The Corpus Christi Police Department’s Red Ribbon Week campaign committee cordially invites you to attend a Red Ribbon Week kick-off ceremony to be held on at Sherrill Park on Wednesday, October 12, 2011 beginning at 10:00 a.m.  Sherrill Park is located on the esplanade of Shoreline Boulevard between Coopers Alley and Kinney Street. Our keynote speaker will be Nueces County District Attorney Mark Skurka.

Red Ribbon Week was established in 1988 to honor fallen officer, Enrique “Kiki” Camarena, a Drug Enforcement Administration Agent who was killed in the line of duty while working undercover in Mexico. This year marks the 26th anniversary of his death. The annual campaign brings attention to the effects of drug abuse, including illegal drugs, alcohol and prescription drugs, and the importance of drug abuse prevention.

The Corpus Christi Police Department, the United States Custom and Border Protection, and other local law enforcement agencies will visit schools throughout the month of October to educate and organize students to create a drug free environment.

Please join us as we celebrate this continued partnership between the community and law enforcement.

Refreshments will be served immediately following the ceremony.  Please see attached calendar for listed events.

For further information contact:

Javier Cantu, Senior Officer
Corpus Christi Police Department
Directed Patrol Officer
Cell:  361-533-5174

For schedule of events, click here:  Red Ribbon Week Schedule